Posts Tagged Marketing and Advertising

Competition and the Consumer’s Mind


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Formulas, Goals, and the Battlefield

I usually agree with Seth Godin on most things, but this one is a bit too far out for me.  I’ve included the entire post on his blog below, it short, and also a link to his blog if you want to read any of the comments there.  So take a quick read and I’ll continue below:

Compared to magical

The easiest way to sell yourself short is to compare your work to the competition. To say that you are 5% cheaper or have one or two features that stand out–this is a formula for slightly better mediocrity.

The goal ought to be to compare yourself not to the best your peers or the competition has managed to get through a committee or down on paper, but to an unattainable, magical unicorn.

Compared to that, how are you doing?

– Seth Godin

Formula: Short Sale

I do agree with Godin that many companies sell themselves short.  Always trying to lower the bar in the hope of gaining a few customers.    Where I disagree with Godin on this is that it’s not because of the comparison to competitors, but rather a poor strategy for taking consumers away from those competitors based on the tactics that are short sighted.

Goal: Long Term Relationship

The tactics you use should be based on the principle that your company is seen as the better choice.  There are many areas a consumer could focus to answer this question.  It is your job to make the answer self-evident when it come to comparing your company to your competitors.

The Battlefield

We fight on the battlefield of the consumer’s mind.  It’s one of the smallest battlefield you will ever find yourself on, about 6 inches.   You should create campaigns that, hopefully, take up territory.  And if you do it well, you should hold more ground then your competitors.  The strategy is different for each company.  It is based on the position of your product in the market place and how our competitors currently stand.  We recommend following the “Marketing Warfare” strategies laid out by Ries and Trout.  So make sure your strategy fits your goals.

Because the last time I checked … your consumers aren’t looking to buy Magical Unicorns … and I’m fairly certain you haven’t hired anyone with unicorn making skills recently.

Good Hunting and would love to read your comments on this topic.

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Or Current Resident?


Buffalo and Fort Erie Public Bridge Authority

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Intimacy is expensive, why abuse it? This week the ROI Hunters are amazed at the foolishness of some of the big service providers. They send out information for us to act on but add an extra line in the mailing label that just destroys everything they hope to achieve. After all, hunting ROI requires you to know your prey!

What an insult.

Those three little words on the mailing label: “Or Current Resident“. Don’t they understand what damage it does. We pay these companies large amounts of our resource to use their services and we expect them to send us relevant and timely information or special offers because we are valued. What is suppose to be an opportunity to further evolve the relationship with the client becomes just a cheep marketing tactic to sell more stuff.

What are you really telling me.

The message is clear. The offer enclosed in this envelope is no more personalized or sensitive to our needs, our account information, our interests, then the yellow pages we just looked at to find a new service provider. In fact, the service provider probably thinks so little of us that the material enclose in the envelope is probably more applicable if we weren’t there and some stranger opened it.

Segmentation Works

The ROI Hunters always advise our clients to be specific and focused in your communications. When communicating to your clients, speak only to your clients. When designing a new campaign to attract new clients, don’t send it to your clients. It might just be the excuse they need to dump your company for another. Good Hunting.

See Also: Press One for English

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